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Weaponizing Your Pets 8: The Conclusions

The closing part of Mr. Bransfield’s presentation highlights the key takeaways from his research and some extracurricular activities for the Defcon community.

Basic takeaways

Basic takeaways

So, what have we learned overall? A tech hobbyist with no prior firmware experience can create a functional War Kitteh Collar in a relatively short amount of time. You can do this too. I didn’t know a damn thing about this stuff when I got started, and I got frustrated but I kept at it – and bam, I got some really cool stuff. In 2014 there are still unsecured WiFi hotspots around. Lots of devices still probe for stuff. There’s still no patch for human stupidity. And cats – and dogs – are really hard to work with.

The 'thanks' list

The ‘thanks’ list

I’ve got to give a shout out to all these guys (see right-hand image). JK Devices – don’t go there, they are terrible. Thanks to Reeves, Bill, Joe, Joey, Nancy, Ricky, V-dog.owners, the Spark.io guys, the Nova Labs guys, V-dog, Skitzy, Coco, Tenacity, and of course Defcon. I’m so proud to be here! Everywhere I go with this community, you guys are willing to help. If you’re not a jerk you’ll be very accommodating and all that good stuff. You should be proud of this hacker community, and I’m proud to be associated with you guys. And because of that, I went out and did some extracurricular activities for Defcon with regard to the Denial of Service Dog and the War Kitteh.

More girls

More girls

A couple of girls

A couple of girls

BadKitty in all her glory

BadKitty in all her glory

 

Defcon 22’s volunteer War Kitteh is the host of Hacker Jeopardy, Bad Kitty (see leftmost image above). She’s wearing the collar, folks! Look at her! We went up and down walking the Strip. There we are with a couple of girls (see middle image above); there we are with a couple more street performers (see rightmost image above); Zach Galifianakis guy showed up; we hit a couple of monuments and did all stuff (see leftmost image below); and we had a couple of really willing participants (middle image below); and a couple of not-so-willing participants (rightmost image below).

Not-so-willing participants

Not-so-willing participants

Willing participants

Willing participants

Cool monuments

Cool monuments

 

But here are the results from walking up and down Defcon, of walking up and down the Vegas Strip (see leftmost image below). And I couldn’t get the Kitty to work because of probably the demo fail, but that’s what we did just for you guys over the past couple of days.

Defcon Denial of Service Dog

Defcon Denial of Service Dog

Video demo fail

Video demo fail

Vegas Strip results

Vegas Strip results

 

Volunteer DoS Dog

Volunteer DoS Dog

And of course, we’ve had the War Kitteh, and we need the Denial of Service Dog (see rightmost image above). So we found a volunteer Denial of Service Dog, everybody’s favorite goon SkyDog (see right-hand image). I was explaining to him what I’d like him to do and all this good stuff, he would listen to me and say: “Gene, Gene, Gene… I don’t need a backpack to denial-of-service somebody. If I want them to sing Circus Afro, they will sing Circus Afro.”

CNN's try

CNN’s try

I got so much attention paid to me. I never expected all this. A lot of cool stuff, this is my best Defcon ever! But I got to leave you guys with this really hilarious funny thing that happened to me. CNN did this to the War Kitteh (see right-hand image). They strapped a GoPro to his back, with tape. Yeah, exactly, and then they’re like: “Okay cat, get up and walk around, do this.” And the cat’s like: “No, I’m not going anywhere, screw you people!” So CNN found out what I had also desperately found out over this whole thing: cats are just damn hard to work with.

Thank you guys very much!
 

Read previous: Weaponizing Your Pets 7: The Denial of Service Dog in Action

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